Spring 2021 Sidecar Courses

Sidecar courses bring together two faculty members who are teaching courses in different departments and on different topics to teach a short interdisciplinary class that focuses on a point of connection. Sidecar courses carry one credit hour, and all students take the course pass/fail.

Our Spring 2021 offerings of sidecar courses are now live in the Course Atlas.

Spring 2021 Sidecar Courses

IDS 290-1 Interdisciplinary Sidecar: COVID Stories/how we tell them

Instructors

Arri Eisen (ILA) and Robyn Fivush (ILA)

Teaching Assistants

Prasanna Karur and Pushkar Shinde

Meeting Time

F 2-2:50pm ONLINE

Stories, or narratives, are fundamental to the way humans understand and make sense of their experiences. How we tell stories, especially about challenging and stressful events, impacts on both individual well-being and collective social policy. In this sidecar course, we will explore the ways in which narratives of COVID-19 are emerging in scientific, political, economic, and social contexts starting from the first case in Wuhan and ending with narratives regarding the current vaccine. The course will meet for one hour every week; every other week, we will bring in guest speakers who are experts in the different perspectives around COVID-19. Examples of potential guests include public health experts from the CDC, virologists, an ER doctor from Emory, politicians coordinating the response, and vaccine developers. On the alternate weeks, we will discuss the previous week's speaker, and prepare for the upcoming speaker through short readings. Throughout the course, we will focus on the emerging narratives of the pandemic as they affect our personal and societal well-being. Priority enrollment for this class is given to students currently enrolled in IDS 220R (What does it mean to be human?), IDS 205 (Science and the Nature of Evidence). Email Instructors for permission.

IDS 290-2 Art as Activism? Visual Culture of America Social Movements

Instructors

Katie Schank (ILA) and Louis Fagnan (History - Oxford)

Teaching Assistants

Annie Li and Alice Zheng

Meeting Time

F 1:00 - 2:15pm ONLINE

What is the relationship between art and social justice? Does art inspire people to become more politically engaged? Does the creation of art remove people from other types of political action? This course will survey contemporary American art that engages with activism. Students will learn about art concerning social movements in the U.S., discuss varying visual mediums, and explore the difficulties surrounding art institutions and accessibility. We will cover movements such as the Women's Liberation, Black Power, Chicano, American Indian, and Asian American movements. Adopting an interdisciplinary lens combining history, art history, and visual culture, we will explore the complexities of identity politics concerning race, class, sexuality, and their intersections. Priority enrollment for this class is given to students currently enrolled in IDS 216 Visual Culture. Email Instructors for permission

IDS 290-3 BIPOC and LGBT Adaptations of Ancient Greek Texts

Instructors

Louise Pratt (Classics) and Peter Wakefield (ILA)

Teaching Assistants

Lydia Abedeen and Karissa Kang

Meeting Time

F 2:40 - 3:55pm ONLINE

"The master's tools will never dismantle the master's house."-Audre Lorde. Classics, the study of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, has long been accused of elitism. This claim is far from groundless. Classics comes etymologically from classicus, a Latin word meaning "of or belonging to the highest class." This is telling, for, at least in Europe and North America, people of the "highest class" have historically claimed Classics as their own. Classics has thus obtained a reputation as plaything of the white, wealthy elite. Classics might seem like one of the "master's tools" tools used by dominant groups to oppress and control others. These are the sort of tools that, according to Lorde, will never dismantle the master's house. However, the growing tide of Classical adaptations centering marginalized identities calls Lorde's conclusion into question. These adaptations suggest that, although Classics might seem like one of the master's tools, it can actually be subversive and even radical. Students will read and watch excerpts from contemporary adaptations of Ancient Grk texts. As students engage with these adaptations, they examine the extent to which Classics is one of the master's tools, and consider how effectively Classics can dismantle the master's house and provide new understanding. Priority to students in IDS 200W or GRK 102. Email Instructors for permission. Course meets for 10 wks 2/5-4/2/2021.

IDS 290-4 Reading for Pleasure

Instructors

Cynthia Blakeley (ILA) and Kim Loudermilk (ILA)

Teaching Assistants

Katalia Alexander, Jeremy Slater and Ben Thomas

Meeting Time

F 1:00 - 2:15pm ONLINE

This course is open to students enrolled in one of the following courses: AMST/IDS 385W: Advertising in American Culture and IDS 390: Interdisciplinary Research Design. If you are not enrolled in one of these courses but are interested in taking Reading for Pleasure, please contact one of the instructors to inquire about availability. In a typical college schedule filled with mandatory assignments, reading for pleasure, diving into another world simply for the joy of it, can fall by the wayside. This course will help you to carve out time for literary fiction chosen by your peers Our undergraduate TAs will each suggest potential books for the class to read and will lead a class discussion on the chosen book. Students taking the class will help select the books we read. The first class will be held on February 5, and we will meet for a total of 10 consecutive Fridays over the course of the semester, with the last class held on April 9. Our class format will vary; in addition to the three sessions devoted to group discussion of the books we're reading, we'll have two sessions in which students and faculty briefly present favorite books, while another three will potentially entail more creative endeavors, such an online novel or poetry reading, or the screening of a film adaptation. Students will also attend one or two asynchronous literary events.

IDS 290-6 Race, Place, and Space: Sci-Fi and Social Inequities

Instructors

Marjorie Pak (Linguistics) and Dehanza Rogers (Film & Media Studies)

Teaching Assistants

Calen MacDonald and Shreya Pabbaraju

Meeting Time

W 1:00 - 2:15pm ONLINE

Throughout this course we will examine the concerns of gender, race, sexual orientation, and class that have long lain in the subtext of science fiction. We speculate that sci-fis have always underscored inequities in gender, race, sexual orientations, and class, although more recent work is attempting to subvert these tropes. This sidecar will work on investigating social inequities in sci-fi, and how they can help us process different identity conflicts. Together, we will examine the lore behind sci-fi and fantasy works from Frankenstein , Alas Babylon , Hunger Games , Star Trek , the Marvel superhero franchise, and others to see how they challenge or cement the social hierarchies at play. We will examine sci-fi and fantasy works as a metaphor for global disaster and images of heroism, solidarity, and grief. Students will employ intertextual and intercultural analyses to critically think about how the reflexive tendencies of media can hinder or help the fight for social justice, and will be asked to critically consider the media they consume.